You can safely call 2018 an important year when it comes to attention for talented women in the (indie pop) music scene. Several festivals and venues decided to aim for a line-up that consisted of at least 50% women. Some eyebrows frowned, because “it’s about quality, not about gender?”, but then the chicken and the egg quickly came into play. If many bookers and programmers are men, could it be that personal taste and favorite concert experience also play a role? And how well can you put yourself in the shoes of a young woman who wants to go to a concert for the first time? Of course some girls still go for a cool young dog garage rock band to get ecstatic with, but just as many like to see someone on stage with whom they can identify, where the lyrics are about their lives and where talent takes precedence. the looks imposed by the pop industry.

And what did this new view bring us? Well, a shitload of talent on our stage, who suddenly popped up from every nook and cranny and dominated the alternative charts (including our poll results). To name a few: Big Thief, Kaia Kater, Cherry Glazerr, Cate Le Bon, Pip Blom, Snail Mail, and of course Lala Lala!

Because this brings us to the headliner of the evening, namely Lillie West, who, under her stage name Lala Lala, already scored highly at the beginning of 2019 at her performance in Vera, then with the beautiful album ‘Lamb’ (2018) in her pocket. This – somewhat tormented – lady writes about subjects such as drinking, partying and self-destruction and tried to write these problems off on the lo-fi track recorder debut ‘Sleepyhead’ (2016).

We have now arrived in 2021 and the release of “I Want The Door To Open”, an album in which Lillie takes a position with the personal theme: “I want total freedom, total possibility, total acceptance. I want to fall in love with the rock.”

The rock in question is a reference to Sisyphus, the mythical figure doomed by the gods to forever push a boulder up from the depths of Hell. For West, it’s the perfect metaphor for “figuring out who you are, what’s wrong with you, and most importantly, what’s right with you.”

The result is a daring exploration of an artist who wonders how she can be completely herself in this world. The strong songs speak for themselves, in which she looks for the guitar sound of the nineties with more and more space for layered synth parts. Yet it still growls and grinds from all sides, something you will experience especially live.

So we hope with all our might that these talented USA acts can tour normally again soon and that we can hold them in our arms as usual.